The Big Bow Mystery


Read by Adrian Praetzellis

(4.3 stars; 117 reviews)

It's a cold and foggy night in London. A man is horribly murdered in his bedroom, the door locked and bolted on the inside. Scotland Yard is stumped. Yet the seemingly unsolvable case has, as Inspector Grodman says, "one sublimely simple solution" that is revealed in a final chapter full of revelations and a shocking denouement. Detective fiction aficionados will be happy to learn that all the evidence to solve the case is provided. One of the earliest “locked room” mystery stories, The Big Bow Mystery is also a satire of late Victorian society. (Summary by Adrian Praetzellis) (5 hr 5 min)

Chapters

Chapter 01 22:41 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 02 22:07 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 03 24:15 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 04 20:28 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 05 26:04 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 06 26:13 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 07 23:52 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 08 23:34 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 09 12:56 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 10 46:59 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 11 20:03 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 12 36:22 Read by Adrian Praetzellis

Reviews

A splendid reading


(5 stars)

This is arguably the first 'locked-room' mystery novel (1892 UK; 1895 US), that is, a detective story in which the puzzle aspect is the critical element of the plot rather than being an ancillary item, as it was in Le Fanu's Uncle Silas, for example. It is also a pre-Golden-Age-of-Detection prototype in that it follows the rules of 'fair play' by providing the evidence for the solution in the form of clues imbedded in the text, supplies alternative solutions and suspects -- the classic 'red herring' approach -- and has a 'least-likely' suspect as the villain. All that it is lacking is what we would call a proper detective who out-thinks the reader. Many thanks to Adrian Praetzellis whose performance is commendable. A highly recommended reading.

Adrian is the best!


(5 stars)

Adrian is the best narrator by far! I love the way he reads. its so amazing with all the different voices. the book was lovely to.


(0.5 stars)

This is a very well read book, but, the twist at the end has a colossal plot hole. Spoilers, The detective who’s trying to figure out who did the murder, is apparently the murderer. But, if you have really been the murder and had really split the victims throat when he was pretending to discover the victim dead, he would have been covered in blood. Additionally, he says that he covered the man’s face with a handkerchief directly after sweating his throat in order to cover convulsions or cover up the fact that he just killed the guy so that the witness didn’t properly see. That handkerchief would’ve been covered absolutely covered in blood if he had just killed the guy right then, but it would not have been covered in blood if the guy had been killed previously. This is a huge pothole, that the policeman would’ve noticed. Thus, The twist at the end is a colossal disappointment. So while the book as well read, don’t waste your time.

Zangwill do nicely


(5 stars)

Two detectives, one locked room mystery and much sly humour can be found in Zangwill's novel, excellently read here. Zangwill was most famous for his tales of Jewish life, many still in print, but those other books of his I have read (e.g The Celibate's Club) which are of more general interest, as this one is, are also witty and well written. Discovering this for a free download was an exra pleasure for someone who thinks the writer underrated as a humourist. There's delightful portrayal of several important characters here by the reader - notably that of Crowl, the absurd anti-faddist and athiest, my favourite. If the final solution to the mystery does not *quite* convince, it's still fun and the whole is very recommendable.

Great book, great reading.


(4 stars)

I had never heard of Israel Zangwill, but enjoyed this book thoroughly. Adrian Praetzellis' reading is of a very high standard and really helps to add colour to both setting and character. The book is very well written, managing to not only provide a genuinely intriguing mystery, but also to broadly examine the society of the time; often with a gentle, satirical humour. Highly recommended.

Good story


(5 stars)

A well-loved working man's man is found murdered in a locked room. Only circumstantial evidence points to his best friend as the murderer, yet Inspector Wimp weaves it into a strong enough case to have the man convicted and sentenced to death. Former Inspector Grodman is convinced of the man's innocence. Which man is correct? Recordings and voice were excellent, thank you!


(5 stars)

Engaging tale with excellent, historically accurate, background (in re union movement, religious skepticism, etc) in the various characters. Very well narrated by the reliable Adrian Praetzellis. For mystery lovers, a great example of the golden age of mystery stories.

Very Good


(5 stars)

Avery good story, well read. The author seems to enjoy wordplay puns and irony and may even border on the surreal at times. He can be a bit long winded but I enjoyed the he book.