The Problems of Philosophy


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(4.6 stars; 71 reviews)

The Problems of Philosophy is one of Bertrand Russell's attempts to create a brief and accessible guide to the problems of philosophy. Focusing on problems he believes will provoke positive and constructive discussion, Russell concentrates on knowledge rather than metaphysics.
Russell guides the reader through his famous distinction between "knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description" and introduces important theories of Plato, Aristotle, René Descartes, David Hume, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, Georg Hegel and others to lay the foundation for philosophical inquiry by general readers and scholars alike. (Summary from Wikipedia) (4 hr 50 min)

Chapters

Preface / Chapter I - Appearance and Reality 17:50 Read by Leon Mire
Chapter II - The Existence of Matter 19:54 Read by Accent
Chapter III - The Nature of Matter 20:00 Read by Accent
Chapter IV - Idealism 16:12 Read by Rich Meyers
Chapter V - Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description 28:15 Read by Nathalie J.
Chapter VI - On Induction 16:42 Read by Jim Eastman
Chapter VII - On Our Knowledge of General Principles 16:56 Read by Professor Chronotis
Chapter VIII - How A Priori Knowledge Is Possible 16:07 Read by ML Cohen
Chapter IX - The World of Universals 21:04 Read by Chris Masterson
Chapter X - On Our Knowledge of Universals 19:46 Read by Chris Masterson
Chapter XI - On Intuitive Knowledge 20:53 Read by Robert Scott
Chapter XII - Truth and Falsehood 17:41 Read by Professor Chronotis
Chapter XIII - Knowledge, Error, and Probable Opinion 21:48 Read by Chris Masterson
Chapter XIV - The Limits of Philosophical Knowledge 21:00 Read by Jacob Miller
Chapter XV - The Value of Philosophy / Bibliographical Note 16:28 Read by Leon Mire

Reviews

the problem...

(5 stars)

well read and, appropriately, inconclusive.

(5 stars)

Bertrand Russell is the 20th century's greatest philosopher. In this book he looks into the root problems of philosophy: is the universe just a concept in the mind of God, or does it exist a priori? Russell makes a strong case for the latter, exploring universal and particular truths, what is solvable and what is the role of philosophy with regard to math and physics. It is in this final question that his weakness is apparent: while acknowledging the existence of non-Euclidian math Russell still makes the fundamental error of assuming that a line can go on forever or a segment is infinitely divisible, two things we know to be false in the universe we live in; what he failed to explain was that concepts like infinite lines or infinite divisibility are merely constructs that are just as valid as their opposite. Still this is a great book that will get you up to speed with the state of philosophy and metaphysics as of the mid 20th century.

The Problems of Philosophy is one of Bertrand Russell's attempts

(3 stars)

The Problems of Philosophy is one of Bertrand Russell's attempts to create a brief and accessible guide to the problems of philosophy. Focusing on problems he believes will provoke positive and constructive discussion, Russell concentrates on knowledge rather than metaphysics. Russell guides the reader through his famous distinction between "knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge by description" and introduces important theories of Plato, Aristotle, René Descartes, David Hume, John Locke, Immanuel Kant, Georg Hegel and others to lay the foundation for philosophical inquiry by general readers and scholars alike. (Summary from Wikipedia) (4 hr 50 min)

Great introduction to philosophy

(5 stars)

Great way to step into philosophy

(5 stars)

Very well read and understandable. 👍🏻