Madame Bovary (Version 2)


Read by Peter Dann

(4.8 stars; 8 reviews)

Written over a century and a half ago, Madame Bovary is still an extraordinarily fresh, exciting and shockingly frank novel, at once an acute psychological study of a woman drawn into adultery through circumstances we can partly understand, and a sharply-observed comedy that offers a fascinating glimpse of the social and cultural divisions running through French provincial society in the mid nineteenth century. This translation is by Eleanor Marx-Aveling, a prominent social activist and literary translator. She was the youngest daughter of Karl Marx. (Summary by Peter Dann) (12 hr 33 min)

Chapters

Part I, Chapter 1 22:04 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 2 18:50 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 3 13:02 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 4 12:47 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 5 7:51 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 6 12:19 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 7 14:43 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 8 23:27 Read by Peter Dann
Part I, Chapter 9 26:39 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 1 21:26 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 2 14:34 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 3 25:34 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 4 9:08 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 5 20:04 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 6 26:36 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 7 19:11 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 8 50:26 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 9 22:03 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 10 18:32 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 11 28:07 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 12 29:59 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 13 22:10 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 14 23:26 Read by Peter Dann
Part II, Chapter 15 19:49 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 1 32:29 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 2 20:27 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 3 4:51 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 4 6:31 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 5 34:55 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 6 35:55 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 7 27:34 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 8 37:40 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 9 17:26 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 10 12:47 Read by Peter Dann
Part III, Chapter 11 20:05 Read by Peter Dann

Reviews

Nothing wrong with the audiobook...


(3.5 stars)

... but frankly, I am not a fan of the story. Sure, the narration has stylistic value, but to today's readers the style is already familiar and for me, to be quite honest, it was simply dull. It reads like a nature documentary and I found there was little tension or subtext in the story (not to mention that since Flaubert's days, these kind of stories of doomed women have gotten so common that it's hard not to find them tiresome). However, the reading itself was great and I am very grateful of the recording because I don't think I could have finished this by reading it on my own.

A Classic, but not sure why…


(5 stars)

First, thank you to Peter Dann for his excellent reading and making this wonderful contribution to the LibriVox catalog. He is one of the very best readers. Tasked with reading this in high school, I returned to see if it held a similar fascination. While shocking for its time, the study of characters who are incapable of suspecting themselves or others of the obvious is perhaps now, and even then, somewhat improbable and less credible. But I suspect that there’s a moral in this story somewhere.

A Classic of Realistic Fiction


(5 stars)

A story of love, romance,and the despair when love does not seem enough in life. IRead this first in my 20s, again at 40. Now nearing retirement, the same tale has spoken a different sense of meaning each time. The misery she left after her suicide now seems the worst most selfish act was her suicide. A cowardly way to leave all with ongoing misery. Reader was very fine.

I love this book.


(5 stars)

The reader is superb