A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (version 2)


Read by John Greenman

(4.8 stars; 51 reviews)

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is an 1889 novel by American humorist and writer Mark Twain. The work is a very early example of time travel in literature, anticipating by six years H. G. Wells' The Time Machine of 1895 (however, unlike Wells, Twain does not give any real explanation of his protagonist's traveling in time). Some early editions are entitled A Yankee at the Court of King Arthur. (Summary by Wikipedia) (11 hr 49 min)

Chapters

Preface and Chapter 1 Camelot. 21:47 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 2 King Arthur's Court. 12:32 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 3 Knights of the Table Round. 13:27 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 4 Sir Dinadan the Humorist. 7:38 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 5 An Inspiration. 12:00 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 6 The Eclipse. 14:42 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 7 Merlin's Tower. 14:52 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 8 The Boss. 14:32 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 9 The Tournament. 13:53 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 10 Beginnings of Civilization. 10:10 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 11 The Yankee in Search of Adventures. 16:55 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 12 Slow Torture. 9:57 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 13 Freemen! 18:22 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 14 "Defend Thee, Lord!" 8:23 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 15 Sandy's Tale. 17:37 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 16 Morgan Le Fay. 14:22 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 17 A Royal Banquet. 18:48 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 18 In the Queen's Dungeons. 23:30 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 19 Knight-Errantry as a Trade. 7:19 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 20 The Ogre's Castle. 15:11 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 21 The Pilgrims 26:20 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 22 The Holy Fountain. 22:23 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 23 Restoration of the Fountain. 17:21 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 24 A Rival Magician. 21:46 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 25 A Competitive Examination. 26:26 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 26 The First Newspaper. 20:39 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 27 The Yankee and the King Travel Incognito. 16:49 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 28 Driling the King 9:46 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 29 The Small-Pox Hut. 13:48 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 30 The Tragedy of the Manor-House. 20:15 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 31 Marco. 15:23 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 32 Dowley's Humiliation. 14:16 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 33 Sixth Century Political Economy. 25:18 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 34 The Yankee and the King Sold as Slaves. 23:37 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 35 A Pitiful Incident. 16:26 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 36 An Encounter in the Dark. 8:21 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 37 An Awful Predicament. 14:29 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 38 Sir Launcelot and Knights to the Rescue. 5:43 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 39 The Yankee's Fight With the Knights. 21:41 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 40 Three Years Later. 15:54 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 41 The Interdict. 8:48 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 42 War! 22:26 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 43 The Battle of the Sand-Belt. 27:19 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 44 A Postscript by Clarence and Final P.S. by M.T. 8:19 Read by John Greenman

Reviews

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain

(5 stars)

love this book!! John Greenman reads it perfectly!

Stars for reader, not book

(4 stars)

First, the reader did a great job, 4/5 stars. Second the book is pretty awful, 1/5 stars. A light and humorous depiction of serious problems of the 19th century ruined by the main character's complete intolerance for anything not his own idea or style pretty much sums it up. I just couldn't get into the satire side of it because the main character, Hank Morgan or The Boss, was such a vain idiot. Was the biggest 19th century issue vanity? It's hard not to call him self centered since even his "altruistic" acts are weighed in his mind for the benefit they will convey upon him. Honestly, I kind of hated the superior attitude he struck when talking about the 6th century people. Thinking of it as an unintended satirization of European treatment of Africans and American treatment of Native Americans made it more palatable. Hank Morgan's self aggrandizing theatricality over shadowed more serious issues like slavery, equality, fair wages, etc. I'm not really sure why so many people like this book.

Great!

(5 stars)

Wonderful story read by an amazing reader. I would listen to anything Mr. Greenman read anything! It is well worth your time.

The real Middle Ages

(4 stars)

This book should be required reading for those always talking about the good old days. As Twain clearly shows they were usually very bad days for most of the people. However the book is quite long and the author labours his criticism of the knights and royalty over and over. Still it gets 4 stars for being a cracking good tale and for a fabulous narration from John Greenman.

most impressive listen ever!

(5 stars)

This is my favorite listen of all time! The reader is fluent and well spoken, and the story is absolutely fantastic! Thank you so much LibriVox!

A superb description of humanity's weaknesses .

(4 stars)

This is an incredible listen.

Excellent reading

(5 stars)

This is one of best spoken readings of a book that I have found on LV. I look forward to finding other readings by this speaker.

A very characterful reading

(5 stars)

I have long thought I ought to read A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, but have never got around to it. When I saw that a recording from LibriVox was available I decided to add it to my queue. I've enjoyed most of the Mark Twain I have read, and I expected to enjoy this too. The story I actually found quite disappointing. The tone is quite didactic, and the references to "modern" times are too obvious to miss, and too clunky to fit easily into the story. I would have stopped listening if it hadn't been for the superb quality of John Greenman's reading. The characters are subtly, but distinctly, voiced. Hank has an appropriately bossy, cocksure tone, leavened occasionally with wonderful notes of irony. The people from King Arthur's time sound suitably naive and credulous. Old people sound old, young people sound young, nobles sound arrogant, and poor people sound beaten down. I can't recommend this reading highly enough.