Tess of the d'Urbervilles


Read by Adrian Praetzellis

(4.7 stars; 207 reviews)

One of the greatest English tragic novels, TESS OF THE D’URBERVILLES (1891) is the story of a “pure woman” who is victimized both by conventional morality and its antithesis. Born near Dorchester, Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) set most of his stories in the region between Berkshire and Dorset in the fictional county of Wessex. He was a controversial writer whose work often showed the result of flouting the rigid Victorian moral code — his novel JUDE THE OBSCURE was (allegedly) burned by the Bishop of Wakefield for its shocking content. Hardy was an unflinching observer and in TESS has left us some unforgettable vignettes of rural life in late 19th-century England: the slow death of a flock of wounded pheasants, the monotony of field labour under an iron gray sky, and the itinerant farm worker’s seasonal round. (Summary by Adrian Praetzellis) (17 hr 51 min)

Chapters

Chapter 1 13:39 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 2 20:11 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 3 17:28 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 4 27:58 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 5 24:15 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 6 12:13 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 7 11:55 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 8 11:50 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 9 14:44 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 10 23:11 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 11 15:16 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 12 22:07 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 13 9:27 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 14 33:57 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 15 8:13 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 16 14:58 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 17 20:06 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 18 19:50 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 19 20:35 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 20 11:12 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 21 16:02 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 22 8:03 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 23 18:20 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 24 10:55 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 25 24:06 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 26 17:15 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 27 15:40 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 28 13:54 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 29 15:34 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 30 17:31 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 31 24:56 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 32 16:42 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 33 25:36 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 34 26:39 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 35 23:19 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 36 28:05 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 37 23:48 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 38 13:06 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 39 17:15 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 40 17:31 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 41 19:10 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 42 13:32 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 43 27:21 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 44 24:57 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 45 23:42 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 46 28:33 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 47 22:29 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 48 16:00 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 49 19:53 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 50 18:47 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 51 19:43 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 52 19:41 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 53 – Chapter 54 24:08 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 55 – Chapter 56 23:11 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 57 16:31 Read by Adrian Praetzellis
Chapter 58 – Chapter 59 26:53 Read by Adrian Praetzellis

Reviews

Masterful narration for a beautifully heart-wrenching story

(5 stars)

Adrian Praetzellis gives a caring performance, allowing the story to come to life. The characters voices are well chosen and distinct; the English accent is a fine touch; the gentle pace good.

flawless

(5 stars)

This reading is a labour of love - flawless, sensitive, technically clear, perfectly paced.

An impressive recording

(5 stars)

The novel centers around a young woman who struggles to find her place in society. When it is discovered that the low-class Durbeyfield family is in reality the d'Urbervilles, the last of a famous bloodline that dates back hundreds of years, the mother sends her eldest daughter, Tess, to beg money from relations with the obvious desire that Tess wed the rich Mr. d'Urberville. Thus begins a tale of woe in which a wealthy man cruelly mistreats a poor girl. Tess is taken advantage of by Mr. d'Urberville and leaves his house, returning home to have their child, who subsequently dies. Throughout the rest of this fascinating novel, Tess is tormented by guilt at the thought of her impurity and vows to never marry. She is tested when she meets Angel, the clever son of a priest, and falls in love with him. After days of pleading, Tess gives in to Angel and consents to marry him. Angel deserts Tess when he finds the innocent country girl he fell in love with is not so pure. Many thanks to Mr Praetzellis for his wonderful reading of Hardy's novel. His performance will please all fans of classic British literature.

Tess of the D'ubervilles

(5 stars)

Both writer and reader had me almost putting everything else on hold from. the middle of the story to the very last sentence of this literary masterpiece.

Tess of the d'urbervilles

(5 stars)

Amazing novel, amazing reader. Thank you for making this so enjoyable Adrian.

(5 stars)

Thank you Mr. P for your sensitive and engaging rendition of this beautifully written, sad and at times even tearjerking (the baptism had me crying my eyes out) masterpiece. Tess is a very likeable young woman who appears to have born under the dark cloud of her ancient extinct ancestors, the d,Urbervilles. Although fate has dealt her mostly a cruel hand, it is she herself who ultimately chooses the action which seals her tragic fate. Great reading of a great novel.

A Moving Story

(5 stars)

Terrific reading. The depth of this tale, spiritually, historically, as well as the various characters is amazing. How much pain and suffering has been and still is the result of religious guilt, shame, and self-righteous, controlling morality? I'm glad some people are more open in modern times to discuss sexuality, and that religion has less power over individual choice. I'm impatient with detailed descriptions of scenery, though I suppose before television and movies it was more necessary.

Wow.

(5 stars)

I am absolutely floored by Hardy's excellence as an author in this book. I was force-fed it in high school, at a time I had no appreciation for such things, but ten years later this story has had a major impact on me. Once again Adrian provided an absolutely excellent reading. He is one of my favorite narrators on Librivox!