What Prohibition Has Done to America


Read by LibriVox Volunteers

(4.4 stars; 6 reviews)

In What Prohibition Has Done to America, Fabian Franklin presents a concise but forceful argument against the Eighteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Beginning in 1920, this Amendment prohibited the sale and manufacture of alcoholic beverages in the United States, until it was repealed in 1933. Franklin contends that the Amendment "is not only a crime against the Constitution of the United States, and not only a crime against the whole spirit of our Federal system, but a crime against the first principles of rational government." Writing only two years after Prohibition began, he correctly predicts many of its disastrous consequences, such as runaway bootlegging and organized crime. The book is both a passionate defense of liberty, and a reminder to Americans of the perils of surrendering it. (Summary by Leon Mire)

(2 hr 21 min)

Chapters

01 - Perverting the Constitution 10:22 Read by Joshua B. Christensen
02 - Creating a Nation of Lawbreakers 10:50 Read by Leon Mire
03 - Destroying Our Federal System 12:39 Read by Great Plains
04 - How the Amendment Was Put Through 13:45 Read by Great Plains
05 - The Law Makers and the Law 6:56 Read by Carolyn Lawson
06 - The Law Enforcers and the Law 10:26 Read by Sibella Denton
07 - Nature of the Prohibitionist Tyranny 18:36 Read by Great Plains
08 - One Half of One Percent 10:01 Read by Great Plains
09 - Prohibition and Liberty 24:21 Read by jude kaider
10 - Prohibition and Socialism 12:48 Read by jude kaider
11 - Is There Any Way Out? 10:56 Read by jude kaider

Reviews

An eye opening!!

(5 stars)

One thing is clear, that prohibition is the worst thing have been created by human. In my opinion moderation is the key ingredient for a healthy society. Hope the future governments will understand the benefits of moderation, and see the distraction,and chaos prohibition can bring. The best example of prohibition is the black market!! The sad part is we as citizens of this country we cut in the middle of this political game.

Very interesting, thanks! Too bad

(3.5 stars)

he didn't write it two years before Volstead instead of after! It seems to me the drys only won because the Great War distracted everyone just enough.