The Warden (version 2)


Read by Jessica Louise

(4.2 stars; 5 reviews)

Anthony Trollope sets the scene for his wonderful Chronicles of Barsetshire with this short novel about Septimus Harding's challenged ecclesiastical seat as the warden of Hiram's Hospital. To make things more interesting, the man doing the challenging - John Bold - also happens to be courting Mr. Harding's daughter, Eleanor. (Summary by JessicaLouise)

Novels in the series are:
1-The Warden
1-The Warden (version 2)
2-Barchester Towers
3-Doctor Thorne
4-Framley Parsonage
5-The Small House at Allington
6-The Last Chronicle of Barset

(7 hr 24 min)

Chapters

Hiram's Hospital 14:28 Read by Jessica Louise
The Barchester Reformer 25:48 Read by Jessica Louise
The Bishop of Barchester 25:37 Read by Jessica Louise
Hiram's Bedesmen 17:27 Read by Jessica Louise
Dr. Grantly Visits the Hospital 26:56 Read by Jessica Louise
The Warden's Tea Party 25:39 Read by Jessica Louise
The Jupiter 11:56 Read by Jessica Louise
Plumstead Episcopi 24:03 Read by Jessica Louise
The Conference 22:01 Read by Jessica Louise
Tribulation 19:41 Read by Jessica Louise
Iphigenia 28:16 Read by Jessica Louise
Mr. Bold's Visit to Plumstead 18:14 Read by Jessica Louise
The Warden's Decision 16:16 Read by Jessica Louise
Mount Olympus 22:09 Read by Jessica Louise
Tom Towers, Dr. Anticant, and Mr. Sentiment 29:59 Read by Jessica Louise
A Long Day in London 29:41 Read by Jessica Louise
Sir Abraham Haphazard 15:08 Read by Jessica Louise
The Warden Is Very Obstinate 12:27 Read by Jessica Louise
The Warden Resigns 22:20 Read by Jessica Louise
Farewell 25:31 Read by Jessica Louise
Conclusion 11:06 Read by Jessica Louise

Reviews

Not for profit

(3 stars)

Septimus Hardy is that rarity - an honest, "disinterested", Church of England cleric. For 10 years, he has held the living as warden at a charitable "hospital", founded centuries ago for impoverished but worthy tradesmen. When in the interest of reform, John Bold, Warden Hardy's daughter's suitor, brings a suit against the church for diverting alms to the clergy rather than the poor. All manner of trouble arises when Mr. Hardy's conscience clashes with the plans of his Arch Deacon, who also happens to be his son-in-law. Employing subtle (and sometimes not) satire to age old conflicts between right/wrong, church/society, rich/poor, law/common sense, Trollope prods his readers to consider the nature of charity and society's obligations to the less fortunate. He presents both sides with fairness, providing no easy solution to a problem that is always with us. Thought provoking and still topical, though originally published in 1855.