The Woman Who Did


Read by Ruth Golding

(4.4 stars; 17 reviews)


Most times, especially in the time when this book was written (1895), it is just as nature and society would wish: a man and woman "fall in love" and get married. But it is not so for Herminia Barton and Alan Merrick. They do indeed fall in love, but Herminia has a deeply held belief in freedom for women, and she holds immutable views against what she perceives as the slavery of marriage.

Alan unwillingly agrees to her strong wish to remain unmarried and to live together as "close and dear friends". When the birth of their child is imminent, they go to his beloved Italy to avoid the condemnation of English society.

From this point on, many questions are raised: is marriage indeed so important? Is strong will always good? Is it right to go against society? And if it is, when should we stop and consider the effects on other people? What should a child do when she is raised to be what her mother dreams and develops her own dreams in the process? And, finally, how much should parents sacrifice for their children? (Summary by Stav Nisser and Ruth Golding)

(6 hr 1 min)

Chapters

Chapter I 20:52 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter II 12:31 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter III 37:37 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter IV 12:58 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter V 22:48 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter VI 14:57 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter VII 17:22 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter VIII 13:09 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter IX 18:30 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter X 14:48 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XI 13:34 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XII 16:18 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XIII 17:33 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XIV 10:00 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XV 16:11 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XVI 15:10 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XVII 14:13 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XVIII 16:36 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XIX 15:56 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XX 7:55 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XXI 12:38 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XXII 8:29 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XXIII 4:00 Read by Ruth Golding
Chapter XXIV 7:09 Read by Ruth Golding

Reviews

(4.5 stars)

Yes It made an interesting point and a very daring one, I am sure, for its time. Well read as usual by Ruth.

My new favorite book

(5 stars)

Excellent story and reading. Loved it.

Very convincingly human story and strong feminist message

(4.5 stars)

Although it does get a bit preachy, such concepts were ground-breaking at the time, so there are thorough (and repeated?) explanations of the author's philosophy. This book has certainly made me feel so grateful for what I've been afforded as a 21st century woman. I can live with a man before (or instead of) getting married, if I choose. I can take as long as I like to choose a life partner, or go without. My standing in society does not depend on my marital status. My life path is my own, my goods are my own,and I can choose to demand that my life partner and I are together on the basis of equality. A thousand thanks to the truly-called martyrs (this book is the joyful and painful story of one such, albeit fictional) who paved our way and suffered so that you and I have such freedoms. <P>The book is well written and very well read. The reader puts passion and vehemence where the author seemed to intend it. Read with understanding and conviction, which helps the listener comprehend and empathize.

Nicely Read

(5 stars)

An enjoyable story and the narration is marvelous!

Another splendid reading by Ruth Golding

(5 stars)

This is a tale of rebellion and its aftermath. It follows Herminia Barton, a young woman from a respectable background who decides to set her own course in life. She and her lover move in together and have a child in defiance of social convention prevailing at the time (1895). The consequences of her actions will prove more difficult than Herminia could have imagined. Many thanks to Ruth Golding for her wonderful reading of Grant’s novel. Highly recommended!