The Tragedy of the Korosko


Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)

(4.4 stars; 107 reviews)

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was a British author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction.

Plot Summary: A group of European and American tourists is enjoying its trip in Egypt in the year 1895. They are sailing up the River Nile in a "a turtle-bottomed, round-bowed stern-wheeler", the Korosko. They intend to travel to Abousir at the southern frontier of Egypt, after which the Dervish country starts. They are attacked and abducted by a marauding band of Dervish warriors. (Wikipedia)

(5 hr 23 min)

Chapters

Chapter I 36:33 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter II 16:06 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter III 31:10 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter IV 29:14 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter V 36:45 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter VI 36:19 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter VII 28:48 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter VIII 41:37 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter IX 39:29 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)
Chapter X 27:39 Read by Lars Rolander (1942-2016)

Reviews

Thank you for reading!


(5 stars)

The reader was very entertaining and brought the characters to life. I simply love Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the reader made his story vibrant.

Great Story!!


(5 stars)

This is a great story, with a fast moving plot, great character analyses and development, woven absolutely to perfection. Anyone who enjoys adventure stories will thoroughly enjoy this one! This tale takes place on the Nile during a pleasure cruise, in the late nineteenth century. Things start out lovely, but then they take a turn for the worse. The travelers are in for an experience of a lifetime. The only other thing needed to make this a perfect, rounded experience would be a great performer. Mr Lars Rolander, does an impeccable job performing this story. As with so many of the folks who lend their talents, for others to enjoy all these fine works, he has the skill of a seasoned professional, that just simply could not bettered! I very highly recommend this tale, and would think that it is of such a caliber, that it would appeal to a very broad spectrum of tastes. It is a tale that children and grandparents, mothers and fathers, would all alike be spellbound. Mr Rolander's talent, is so good, I bet he could read a phonebook and keep an audience's attention! I wish to thank all the people who contribute their talents, to make the Internet Archives a fantastic resource, available to all and to Mr Prelinger, without his selflessness and determination, none of this could ever have been realized. Coincidentally, I was listening to "A Thousand Miles Up the Nile" by Amelia B Edwards at the same time as the Korosko. This is a true story by Ms Edwards recounting her travels up the Nile a few years before the fictional story of the Korosko took place. It was a fantastic companion to the Korosko, as it gave a great back ground for the Korosko story. Ms Edwards real life story is very enjoyable and I recommend it highly. It is also available here at the Internet Archives.

Good Story


(5 stars)

Reader did a nice job. Story if engaging. Listen for some of the explanations Doyle has the retired British Colonel give about the cultural terrorism of the "Dervishes" towards the beginning of the book. sounds eerily familiar to things happening in 2017, over 100 years after the book was written.


(5 stars)

Excellent story. The reader has am accent, but the story is well read. and the readers accent is charming.

great book


(5 stars)

this book is very good. sir aurthur conan doyle is a genius.

decent story well read but difficult to follow at first


(3.5 stars)


(5 stars)

oh those whirling dervishes...well read and fine characters.


(4.5 stars)

Not Doyle's best, but compelling to the end