Second Variety


Read by Gregg Margarite (1957-2012)

(4.4 stars; 459 reviews)

Early victories by the USSR in a global nuclear war cause the United Nations government to retreat to the moon leaving behind troops and fierce autonomous robots called “Claws”, which reproduce and redesign themselves in unmanned subterranean factories. After six bloody years of conflict the Soviets call for an urgent conference and UN Major Joseph Hendricks sets out to meet them. Along the way he will discover what the Claws have been up to, and it isn’t good… - Second Variety was first published in the May 1953 edition of Space Science Fiction Magazine. (Summary by Gregg Margarite) (1 hr 43 min)

Chapters

Part 1 55:05 Read by Gregg Margarite (1957-2012)
Part 2 48:26 Read by Gregg Margarite (1957-2012)

Reviews

RIPD + Spoiler Alert

(5 stars)

Reader alert, if its not too late for you already, an illustration is used for the cover of this LV book which fully spoils the coolest plot twists and presolves the central mystery of the story. I'm only half way through but know the ending because I did examine the cover. Do not be tempted if you want to enjoy PKD's plot twists and narrator extraordinaire Gregg's suspense-building read. Thanks, Gregg. Though I never knew ye I enjoy your company. RIPD-rest in the public domain....

I liked it but...

(5 stars)

The concept is well executed by an excellent author. The narrator's delivery was clear and consistent, and added even more life to the characters. Everything about the story and the reading were good. But the cover to the book gave away a key plot point that would have made the tenseness of the situation actually, well, tense. I'm ok with book covers featuring characters and places you don't learn about for a while in a book, but don't give away the twist. I don't think Librivox is at fault here, since they usually just go with whatever cover is on the actual book, but it's still super annoying.

Classic P.K.D.

(5 stars)

A gripping sci-fi classic, the subject matter presages a later work by the author (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), which became the film 'Bladerunner'. The tense, gritty style of the narrator complemented the story very well. One caveat, though (slight spoiler alert!)- The cover illustration for this story depicted a couple obvious dead giveaways about the plot, which kind of spoiled the element of suprise.

(4 stars)

Being that I have taken in so much media in my life and being that there are only so many formulas for a story, every part of this story was predictable. However, this doesn't take away from the story itself as far as characters and setting go. Very enjoyable, quick listen. I'd recommend this to early high school students or anyone else I know who may not be very well versed in the tricks of storytelling.

fantastic story

(5 stars)

I really enjoyed this story. While I will agree that it was short, and want more, it's probably for the better. It's better for a story leave me wanting than to wish it ended sooner. The narrator does pause a bit between words, like Shatner, but soon I didn't even notice it. His delivery was well done, especially compared to some of the other books I've heard.

Excellent!

(5 stars)

This story was fantastic! At the end I was wishing there was more! Dark and gripping the whole way through with some excellent plot twists thrown in the mix. Phillip K Dick does not disappoint here. Plus the reader was amazing, his voice was perfect for the story. I'm sad to hear about his passing; RIP

Predicable but inciteful

(3 stars)

Philip K Dick's writing is superb, as expected, but the story is predictable. The last sentence is brilliant though. The narrator rushes at times, and there's an intermittent background noise that's distracting. Despite all this, I did enjoy it. Maybe there's another recording. One without the noise.

well read

(2.5 stars)

this is well read capturing story. there low eating was due only to the predictable nature of the two climaxes. the first was due to the concert art, the second was just predictable.