The Innocents Abroad


Read by John Greenman

(4.8 stars; 57 reviews)

Writer/entertainer Garrison Keillor (A Prairie Home Companion) on “The Innocents Abroad”: “…one of the best selling travel books of all time.” (The Writer’s Almanac, June 8, 2012)

When you dive into Mark Twain’s (Samuel Clemens’) The Innocents Abroad, you have to be ready to learn more about the unadorned, ungilded reality of 19th century “touring” than you might think you want to learn. This is a tough, literary journey. It was tough for Twain and his fellow “pilgrims”, both religious and otherwise. They set out, on a June day in 1867, to visit major tourist sites in Europe and the near east, including Greece, Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, “the Holy Land”, and Egypt. What Twain records, in often humorous, sometimes grotesque but always fascinating detail, are the day-to-day ups and downs of discovering the truth about people and places. The truths they learn are often far different than their education and rumor have made them preconceive.

This is a voyage of discovery. It’s long and, in places, tiresome. But it’s revelatory about so much. As with some of his other works, Twain includes popular prejudices of his time, which are today considered socially unacceptable. His references to “Indians”, “Negroes” and “infidels” come to mind.

Beyond the lows, though, there are the highs of Twain’s cutting wit and insight as he guides us along the bumpy and often dangerous voyage.

No need to buckle up. Just take it slow, and steady…like the journey itself. (Summary by John Greenman) (19 hr 36 min)

Chapters

Chapter 1 18:22 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 2-3 17:02 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 4-5 29:53 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 6-7 38:52 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 8-9 24:27 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 10-11 26:34 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 12-13 43:07 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 14-15 40:28 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 16-17 30:52 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 18-19 47:14 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 20-21 30:26 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 22 22:21 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 23 27:20 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 24 19:48 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 25 19:47 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 26 39:05 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 27 25:40 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 28 19:02 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 29-30 32:30 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 31 18:42 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 32 29:20 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 33 23:26 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 34 27:22 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 35 11:16 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 36-37 31:05 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 38 17:43 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 39 10:04 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 40 20:17 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 41 14:31 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 42 12:28 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 43 13:30 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 44 23:27 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 45 26:31 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 46 18:29 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 47 28:04 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 48 23:09 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 49 21:35 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 50 21:45 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 51 28:19 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 52 13:35 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 53 32:22 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 54 23:43 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 55 36:34 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 56 9:53 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 57 17:24 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 58 31:52 Read by John Greenman
Chapters 59-60 14:03 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 61 & Conclusion 22:59 Read by John Greenman

Reviews

The innocents abroad

(5 stars)

Again, John Greenman, awesome reading! I have to admit, there were times when I was laughing tears. Mark Twain has the most wonderful sense of humor, I thank you for the privilege to listen to these wonderful stories!

expertly read!

(5 stars)

this gentleman knows his Twain and does a superb job with adding emotion to the text. best read books by far!

the Innocents Abroad

(5 stars)

Mr. Greenman again superbly introduced each chapter to the listeners. His narration is dramatic, lively and funny depending on the situation of each chapter. I enjoyed the entire story twice. Thank you very much.

loved it and listened 3x in a row.

(5 stars)

The reader did an excellent job. I traveled to many of the same places between 1990 and 2010 and am so surprised to hear someone describing so many places the same way I experienced them. Although some things have changed and generally less poor the general attitudes and lyrical descriptions in travelogues have stayed the same. I laughed and laughed. This was my first Mark Twain book and I will go on to the next. I love his humor. Thanks for a job well done.

Good book, good reader

(5 stars)

A fascinating look at the world as it was in the mid 1800s, complete with the prejudices of the day. Twain's irreverent observations give more believable view of the Mediterranean countries than a guide book of the time might. The reader has done a wonderful job bringing the words to life and captures Twain's dry sarcasm very well.

kent berg..

(4 stars)

Absolutely five stars! ( why won't the fifth star lift up?) every mark twain book he reads comes alive in a way that reading doesn't.

revealing

(5 stars)

an insight into the social morals of the time and enjoyable listen well read.

Grand travelogue rife with hilarity!

(5 stars)

I always love the author and the reader has a voice and pace made for reading him. I really enjoy this view of Twain and the world in 1867. This memior shows Twain's humanity and youth- I always see him as a semi serious curmudgeon who wrote things like Huck Finn [which is perfectly fine with me]. His out loud remark of the pretty girl in Paris and her response made me laugh so loud I'd be embarrassed if I had any sense. An educational and funny book- pull up a chaise and loosen your gaiters!