The Warden


Read by LibriVox Volunteers

(4.4 stars; 51 reviews)

Amongst the great popular novelists of the nineteenth century who are still read today, Anthony Trollope stands alongside his contemporary, Charles Dickens. His two series of novels, the political (The Pallisers) and the clerical (The Barsetshire Chronicles) are the best known. This book is the first of the Barsetshire series and was also Trollope’s first really successful novel.

In the mid nineteenth century there were a number of financial scandals in the Church of England including those of Rochester, where the endowments which should have supported the King’s School Canterbury had been diverted to the Dean and Chapter; and of the hospital of St Cross at Winchester where the Rev. Francis North, later the Earl of Guildford, had been appointed to the mastership of the hospital by his father the bishop. The revenues of the hospital were very considerable, the work involved minimal. The scandal soon broke.

Trollope based ‘The Warden’ on the St Cross case, but in the novel the Warden is a kindly, devoted, priest, beloved by all that knew him and is racked by fear that he is accepting money to which he is not entitled. His antagonist is his prospective son-in-law John Bold and his (somewhat unwelcome) ally is one of Trollope’s strongest characters, the Archdeacon of Barchester, Dr. Theophilus Grantly. (summary by Andy Minter)

(7 hr 42 min)

Chapters

Hiram’s Hospital 15:09 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
The Barchester Reformer 27:19 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
The Bishop of Barchester 27:16 Read by Kara Shallenberg
Hiram’s Bedesmen 18:51 Read by Kristin LeMoine
Dr Grantly Visits the Hospital 26:13 Read by Chip
The Warden’s Tea Party 27:22 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
The Jupiter 12:14 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
Plumstead Episcopi 25:10 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
The Conference 22:05 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
Tribulation 20:48 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
Iphigenia 33:23 Read by Kara Shallenberg
Mr Bold’s Visit to Plumstead 18:43 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
The Warden’s Decision 16:19 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
Mount Olympus 24:12 Read by AliceG
Tom Towers, Dr Anticant, and Mr Sentiment 29:07 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
A Long Day in London 31:11 Read by Anita Roy Dobbs
Sir Abraham Haphazard 15:10 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
The Warden Is Very Obstinate 12:38 Read by Mike Gardom
The Warden Resigns 22:49 Read by Mike Gardom
Farewell 25:23 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)
Conclusion 10:53 Read by Andy Minter (1934-2017)

Reviews

amazing story of England's clerical life

(5 stars)

this is a fantastic story of true love for one's fellow man and the obeying of one's conscience it is a beautiful story Anthony trollope is an amazing author and the volunteers were excellent especially Andy Minter you will truly enjoy this story if you care at all for historical fiction

The Warden

(4 stars)

My Comments: Andy Minter reads quite a few chapters in this book, and does his usual, wonderful job of reading life into the characters. I would not have had the patience to read this book in the traditional sense, but it was a very enjoyable listen.

(1.5 stars)

I'm sure this is excellent but the reading is much quieter than other books I have listened to. I'm therefore having to give up as my ipad won't go any louder! I only have "mild" hearing loss. I shall try again when I have hearing aids.

EDUCATIONAL

(4 stars)

A bittersweet story with two warnings. Public "do-gooders" ofteb do more harm than good; weak people often harm others for thei sake of their own so-called peace of mind. It is a shame that Mr. Minter did notread the entre book.

(5 stars)

very good presentation by volunteers and a fascinating insight into the intersection between religion and politics in Victorian England. Thanks once again Librivox for your great contribution to the public domain.

(5 stars)

a little slow start.... but really good readers and lovely story. learned a lot of old English vernacular

Victorian classic

(5 stars)

Though it won't be to everyone's taste, this quiet tale of English clerical life is very readable. Trollope can't resist getting in a sharp stab at Dickens in the latter part of the book.