Socialism: Utopian and Scientific


Read by Bob Neufeld

(4.5 stars; 35 reviews)


The main idea of "Socialism: Utopian and Scientific" (1880) was distinguishing scientific socialism and utopian socialism. Engels begins by chronicaling the thought of utopian socialists, starting with Saint-Simon. He then proceeds to Fourier and Robert Owen. In chapter two, he summarizes dialectics, and then chronicles the thought from the ancient Greeks to Hegel. Chapter three summarizes dialectics in relation to economic and social struggles, essentially echoing the words of Marx.

(Introduction by Wikipedia) (2 hr 48 min)

Chapters

00 - Introduction 57:36 Read by Bob Neufeld
01 - Chapter 1 34:05 Read by Bob Neufeld
02 - Chapter 2 22:32 Read by Bob Neufeld
03 - Chapter 3 54:12 Read by Bob Neufeld

Reviews

so relevant to the 21st century struggle!!

(5 stars)

What has changed since then and now is that more types of people (gays, women, african americans, latinos, etc.) have achieved the freedom to participate in the slavery that is modern corporatism. Let's change that together!

Not bad, it would have been nice if he understood capitalism.

(4 stars)

While is he a very smart man and Rightfully displays the problems of Marxist capitalism, he is unable to recognize that there is a combination of both capitalism and socialism and his issue with capitalism rests entirely around the issues of concentrated wealth and power within the hands of the few. A state commonly proven and unavoidable in socialism and other systems. However, capitalism has built in processes and ideologies to resist such problems at least within Austrian economics in books such as the road to serfdom. I had higher expectations for this reading, perhaps that is the problem. This is from a great mind, and such weak and poorly constructed strawman argument is useless.

Bob is the best reader!

(4 stars)

Amazing read coupled with amazing narration

(5 stars)

The book itself is quite the great read. Its thorough yet concise coverage of the development of socialism in Europe and the circumstances surrounding the process is admirable. Friedrich's analysis and observations of the three European giant's, France, UK and Germany and their roles in the development of socialist theories are profoundly complex and overwhelming. His account of 15th century onwards' revolutionary events is mind opening. But most importantly, the narrator did an outstanding job. His flow is quite tranquil and his voice takes you all the way to 19th century's Germany and beyond. I feel that I'm Friedrich myself or that he's conversing with me. Thank you Bob for your work and for offering us the opportunity to enjoy this work beautifully and aesthetically.