Self and Self-management: Essays about Existing


Read by Ruth Golding

(3.9 stars; 19 reviews)


Bennett's essays always provide food for thought and bring a wry smile to the lips. Human nature, it appears, changes little over the ages, and Bennett, as always, stands the test of time, though in the case of some of the essays in this eclectic collection, it is well to remember that they were written at the time of the First World War and the fight for women's suffrage. (Summary by Ruth Golding)

(1 hr 57 min)

Chapters

1 Running Away from Life 21:31 Read by Ruth Golding
2 Some Axioms about War-work 17:48 Read by Ruth Golding
3 The Diary Habit 18:44 Read by Ruth Golding
4 A Dangerous Lecture to a Young Woman 19:45 Read by Ruth Golding
5 The Complete Fusser 17:51 Read by Ruth Golding
6 The Meaning of Frocks 21:39 Read by Ruth Golding

Reviews

aka How not to fail at being a woman - by a man

(3 stars)

Two stars for the reader, who does a wonderful job. When a self-proclaimed savant tells a disciple, while expounding on 'energy', "It's no use asking what I mean by the word 'energy'," we've left the realm of sense and entered Wonderland.

A piece which adheres slightly too strongly to its time

(4 stars)

Arnold Bennett was an early writer on various subjects, best known now perhaps for stingingly public arguments with Virginia Woolf. In this book, he considers how to find work which is satisfying. His book is, in part, written to women doing war work, and seems to be an expression of his frustration about their complaints that the work is not personally rewarding. He’s an early exponent of the idea of psychological reframing. Not as good as some of his other books, and a little dated, but an interesting look at the mindset of war workers. It is very well read, though.