The Canterville Ghost


Read by David Barnes

(4.6 stars; 326 reviews)

The American Minister and his family have bought the English stately home Canterville Chase, complete with the ghost of Sir Simon de Canterville - blood-stains, clanking chains and all. But these modern Americans will have no truck with ghostly goings-on, and set out to beat the spectre at his own game. (Summary by David Barnes)

(1 hr 23 min)

Chapters

Chapters 1 to 3 36:46 Read by David Barnes
Chapters 4 to 5 25:04 Read by David Barnes
Chapters 6 to 7 21:18 Read by David Barnes

Reviews

Nice little ghost story

(5 stars)

This is a nice little ghost story with a different angle. The reading is superb, one of the best Ive listened to.

Excellent narration

(5 stars)

An excellent narration of an old classic. If you are expecting a normal ghost story, you are in for a surprise...

funny and lovely

(5 stars)

I enjoyed the story. it's good for young children but I am any adult will also enjoy the story. The narrator is very creative with his voice to show proper emotions

19th Century Scooby-Doo

(5 stars)

All the light-hearted prose of a Scooby Doo episode but with 19th Century style and turn of phrase. A quick "read", this is a fun and enticing story that highlights American culture of the time, which is not far from modern perceptions of Americans (good and bad). The reader was also excellent apart from an induced speech impediment for one character voice (Lord Canterville).

very entertaining

(5 stars)

Very entertaining story, and very well read. I had often heard the name of the story but didn't really know what it was about, I'm glad I chose to listen to it

hilarious!

(5 stars)

the whole story is so much satire and stereotypes and general hilarity made funnier by the reader's somber voice. the reader was excellent. definitely adding him to my list of favorites. I will probably come back to read this again.

Excellent listen

(5 stars)

I have loved this story since I was a kid and quite enjoy listening to it now during my meditation periods. The reader has a wonderful voice and adds enough humour that I can picture the different characters perfectly! Thank you for an awesome job!?

Enchanting tales, moving reading

(5 stars)

Wilde used a myriad of comic sources to shape his story. Thomas De Quincey's ‘‘Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts,’’ a satirical essay, is one apparent source. Wilde would also have been aware of Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey (1818), a parody of the Gothic novel so popular in the early nineteenth century. Wilde's own experience on the lecture circuit in the United States undoubtedly helped him ridicule stereotypical American behavior. Indeed, one of the major themes in the story is the culture clash between a sixteenth-century English ghost and a late nineteenth-century American family. But the story also examines the disparity between the public self and the private self, a theme to which Wilde would return again in his later writings. Many thanks to David Barnes for his excellent recording. A great pleasure to listen to!