The Eyes Have It & Tony and the Beetles


Read by Phil Chenevert

(3.9 stars; 64 reviews)

Aliens have invaded the earth! Horrible one celled creatures disguised as normal human beings ! Well, at least that is what it seems to the author. Yes, The Eyes Have It is a whimsical story, making gentle fun of certain writing styles, but only a topflight science-fictionist like Philip Dick , we thought, could have written this story, in just this way. Tony and the Beetles takes place far in the future when Earth's enormous colonial empire is well established but the question is, how long can it last? 10 year old Tony grows up fast when history catches up with the human race. A sobering look at human history .. and our probable future. Two very different stories but both entertaining. (Summary by the magazine editor and Phil Chenevert) (0 hr 42 min)

Chapters

The Eyes Have It 8:39 Read by Phil Chenevert
Tony and the Beetles, part 1 17:28 Read by Phil Chenevert
Tony and the Beetles, part 2 16:52 Read by Phil Chenevert

Reviews

(1 stars)

Goddamnit, just let me hear the end of the story!

NDavis

(2.5 stars)

I liked it. The reader did a great job.

(4 stars)

The first part is hilarious but I am not sure why these books are paired

(5 stars)

Great read fun stories.. Enjoyed much thanks!

(5 stars)

What a sad statement on our society.

Young Horselover Fat

(3 stars)

These stories were more of biographical and intellectual interest. They didn't provide me the immersion ("entertainment?") that I generally get in his more mature work. That darn 70 year copyright horizon must be messing with it. Already in his early 20s, Phil's preoccupation with identity, and with reasoning his way out of paranoid conundrums, can be seen. "The Eyes" must have sold for a few much needed $, but is basically a juvenile joke spun out past the punchline. The theme in "Tony" was much deeper, if a bit awkward. I don't know Phil's biography well enough to know his deliberate intent in 1953, but the allegory about American racism, embedded in the tale of American imperialism, leapt out at me. He clearly recognized the brother humanity of a black working class, and the sadness of its impermeability for his own caste. His concern with Nazi, Fascist, and oppressive domination in general must have come through from his childhood. i wonder if that presages in some way "The Man in the High Castle."

I agree...

(5 stars)

that the second story would be a good way to introduce the subject of racial prejudice but it also would be a good introduction to the long term effects of colonialism and war. What a sad, scary and utterly honest way of looking at ourselves.

Funny and sad story

(5 stars)

I think this is a story that schools would do well to review with their students. It casts a light on social structure without inflaming the passions of people. Excellent work by Phil in both reading and selection. Thanks!