Uncle Tom's Cabin


Read by John Greenman

(4.6 stars; 1448 reviews)

Among the most “banned” books in the United States, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly is a novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe which treats slavery as a central theme. Stowe was a Connecticut-born teacher at the Hartford Female Academy and an active abolitionist. The novel is believed to have had a profound effect on the North’s view of slavery. In fact, when he met Harriet Beecher Stowe, President Lincoln is said to have commented, “So you’re the little lady whose book started the Civil War.” First published on March 20, 1852, the story focuses on the tale of Uncle Tom, a long-suffering black slave, the central character around whose life the other characters—both fellow slaves and slave owners—revolve. The novel depicts the harsh reality of slavery while also showing that Christian love and faith can overcome even something as evil as enslavement of fellow human beings. (summary by Wikipedia and John Greenman)

Note From the Reader: The listener is about to enter a world rich with diverse characters. In order to differentiate between the characters, the reader has given each, his/her own voice. As an adult male reader, however, the reader's representation of women and children will, necessarily be less than adequate. He asks for your indulgence.

(18 hr 6 min)

Chapters

Chapter 1 25:36 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 2 7:45 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 3 12:16 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 4 28:06 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 5 20:36 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 6 21:04 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 7 29:43 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 8 36:38 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 9 39:28 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 10 23:30 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 11 33:11 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 12 39:39 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 13 22:07 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 14 25:06 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 15 40:03 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 16 45:10 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 17 40:54 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 18 39:06 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 19 49:19 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 20 35:15 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 21 11:29 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 22 17:02 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 23 17:11 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 24 16:05 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 25 11:12 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 26 31:01 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 27 18:21 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 28 34:58 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 29 18:09 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 30 23:47 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 31 14:14 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 32 19:49 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 33 16:54 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 34 26:37 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 35 14:47 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 36 15:50 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 37 15:27 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 38 25:06 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 39 22:33 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 40 17:03 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 41 15:44 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 42 15:01 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 43 20:09 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 44 9:05 Read by John Greenman
Chapter 45 24:27 Read by John Greenman

Reviews

Awesome

(5 stars)

Okay. So it took a long time for me to want to listen to this book. So far, so good. I've been able to listen st work and the day has flown by. But whoever is reading is awesome! I love the voiced. it brings the story to life. Also, this book has angered me. What I mean is, slavery is awful! I was so angry how families are torn apart and Tom's good natured attitude about it. The author touches on all types of characters, from the good hearted to the most evil. Awesome, intriguing book. I see why it was banned in the south. It definitely stirs up some emotions.

Greatest Piece of American Literature

(5 stars)

Narrated with enthusiasm and very clear dialect, this audiobook version, is one of the best audiobooks, that I've ever come across. The story is said to have started The Civil War, so my only complaint is that it's one of the least read classics in America. The hardships of Uncle Tom, Eliza, George and the countless others who fell victim to this time period, should be known and understood by all. Read this, share this. It's beautiful written, with emotional scenes ready to tear your heart strings out. You won't regret it.

A must-read

(5 stars)

In my mind this book should be a part of required reading for all high schoolers. It makes my blood boil to think of all the atrocities that were committed in our country's past against the slaves. However, it also makes my blood boil when those *past* atrocities are brought up again and again and thrown in our faces. The past is the past and here and now I truly believe ALL men have available to them all the resources they need to make something of themselves. This book gives a very vivid image of the horrors of slavery and can help those in the subsequent generations to have a clearer view of our history. May we each take it to heart and learn from our past that it is never right for us to take away the freedom of any race. That all men are created equal in the image of God and therefore must be given equal opportunities. Not more, not less, but equal. A word about this recording - John Greenman is an excellent book reader and gives much more color to this reading by his vocal changes for the characters.

uncle toms cabin

(5 stars)

This is a wonderful read. I read it in my youth . As a Southern white lady brought up In rural Alabama I first began to live Author's. Then I loved writings of those. Before first grade I learned to read by myself. I later received an earned doctorate degree in reading from The University of Alabama along with my degree in Education Leadership. My love for my fellow blacks began in my earliest years be reading stories stories about their lives. Not so much of hate but what foods they enjoyed as kids, like me. As I matured I read Uncle Toms Cabin and fell in love with him. Later I would choose to teach at an Historically Black University. Love is the answer to all the racism. My daughter follows in my footsteps without me trying to get her to follow. Did Harriet Beecher Stowe start a war? I say, No, she opened the door of love for my family. By the way I am a conservative Christian.

Great Book

(5 stars)

It's a shame this book was banned, but it is understandable. The atrocities described in this book were quite vivid that it would be hard to try and imagine a person going through those experiences. However, this is our history for both blacks and whites. Stay woke, racism/slavery still exists. Racists/White Supremacist still use the bible as their justification to mistreat blacks yet still don't know their history. Blacks still being denied jobs and human rights when they helped build this nation with other minorities. But there is still good amongst all the evil swirling around. Lend a helping hand when you can, you never know what good can occur from this. Stay woke. Know your history. I've always wanted to read this book, although it wasn't required of me back in school. Finally, at work, I was able to do so. Thankful for it!!

An Amazing and Thought Provoking Book

(5 stars)

A wonderful book. I had to read this for a school assignment and thoroughly enjoyed it. It made me think, and realize even more how sinful our world is, how dependent we are of Christ. It's a downright travesty that this book and the character of Uncle Tom have been made out to be the opposite of what and who they are. It's hard to swallow, but it's a healthy pill. Hopefully we can point back to this story as a reference of godly behavior in struggle and pain.

A Classic that Remains Relevant

(5 stars)

Sometimes I have resisted reading old classic stories in the fear that they would be boring or irrelevant to modern life. I've always preferred stories that offer an escape rather than reminders of how difficult life can be. But despite Uncle Tom's Cabin's age and foundation in American history, I found that it had an almost modern flow that allowed me to escape my own reality for a time. Well written and well read, this story was a great way to relax at the end of the day before bed.

(4 stars)

I was touched by this story. It was so very well written and well read, also. It is an emotional story in the sense that you at once feel angry and ready to burst into tears as you hear of the treatment, sufferings and then victories of the slaves. My only disappointment was the inclusion of strong language. I should like to hear a version with that eliminated so that I may perhaps share it with the higher grade levels at the school in which I teach. If not for this hindrance, I would've gladly given 5 stars.