With Lee in Virginia


Read by LibriVox Volunteers

(4.2 stars; 35 reviews)

Vincent Wingfield is the son of a wealthy Virginian planter. When the country goes to war, he enlists in the cavalry, and sees action under the various generals commanding the army in and near Virginia. He has several private adventures as well, including a personal enemy, prison escape, rescue of a young lady, spying expedition, and recovery of a stolen slave. He rises in rank in the Confederate army, and after the war is over, he marries and returns home to manage his mother's plantation.

Henty in this book gives an overview of the causes of the Civil War, and follows the battles and movements of the army in Virginia and the surrounding area. The issue of slavery is discussed several times from the viewpoint of an Englishman who detested the institution, but saw that most slaves on large plantations were well treated. While not an an exhaustive work, With Lee In Virginia covers the main generals (Lee, Jackson, Stuart, Grant, McClellan, Sherman, Pope, etc.) and the most important battles of the war in an interesting and instructive format. (Summary by Alayna May) (10 hr 30 min)

Chapters

Preface 2:37 Read by Ryan Cherrick
A Virginian Plantation 31:43 Read by Ryan Cherrick
Buying a Slave 32:51 Read by Ryan Cherrick
Aiding a Runaway 31:13 Read by Ryan Cherrick
Safely Back 24:11 Read by Ryan Cherrick
Secession 26:50 Read by Ryan Cherrick
Bull Run 36:24 Read by Ryan Cherrick
The Merrimac and the Monitor 28:44 Read by Ryan Cherrick
McClellan's Advance 28:15 Read by Ryan Cherrick
A Prisoner 28:39 Read by Khaghbboommm
The Escape 30:55 Read by Khaghbboommm
Fugitives 29:09 Read by Khaghbboommm
The Bush-Whackers 29:36 Read by Khaghbboommm
Laid-Up 30:19 Read by Khaghbboommm
Across the Border 33:17 Read by Khaghbboommm
Fredericksburg 29:38 Read by Khaghbboommm
The Search for Dinah 35:15 Read by Khaghbboommm
Chancellorsville 41:14 Read by Khaghbboommm
A Perilous Undertaking 33:44 Read by Khaghbboommm
Free 34:17 Read by Khaghbboommm
The End of the Struggle 31:48 Read by Khaghbboommm

Reviews

NOT BAD

(3.5 stars)

A rather simplistic overview of the terrible War Between the States. Happily, he does note the true reason for the struggle--STATES RIGHTS. He also rightfully counters the patently untrue book by the muckraking Harriet Beecher Stowe. (Before you note that Henty was English and thus could know nothing about lifie in the Old South, please remember that Stowe had never seen a southern plantation and was equaiily unfamuliar with the true state of affairs.) The reading was good throughout.

Love it

(5 stars)

the reader does a great job and the book is wonderful.

(5 stars)

The bravery and suffering of the South during their ill-conceived attempt at secession is a poignant background to this tale. A different and romanticized view of their form of slavery is woven throughout the plot.

A Glimpse into White Supremacy

(2 stars)

In addition to being a piece of historical fiction, this book offers an insight into the attitudes of Confederate sympathizers in the decades after the Civil War. It is an example of how the narrative of Northern aggression against states’ rights fits hand-in-glove with the narrative of white supremacy. The racism on display in this book is staggering, and should be a shock to anyone in the modern era. Henty claims that most slave owners were benevolent and even excoriates those who would treat their slaves cruelly. He directly and indirectly compares blacks to horses, who could be trained to love their masters through kind treatment. He even describes slave life on a plantation as “delightful” at one point. I was disturbed to learn that this book is still read and taught as a fair portrayal of slave life in the antebellum South. That this narrative persists should be good enough reason for critics to give this book a read and understand where those perverse arguments come from.