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Exotics and Retrospectives

Gelesen von LibriVox Volunteers

(3,929 Sterne; 7 Bewertungen)

Lafcadio Hearn, born 1850 in Greece, went to Japan when he was 40 years old and became a Japanese citizen only 6 years later. His writings about Japan from the beginning of the Meiji era, when the country was just opening to the West, remain among the most important explanations of Japanese culture.
This book contains in the first part, "Exotics", his observations of and personal insights into Japan. For example, Fuji no Yama tells about him climbing the highest mountain in Japan; and A Question in the Zen Texts, Literature of the Dead, and Of Moon Desire try to explain Buddhist teachings. In the second part, "Retrospectives", Hearn leaves both Japan and his vantage point as impartial observer behind and delves into personal experiences and musings that occurred to him in the numerous countries he visited. The main topic of these very personal pieces is beauty in all its forms. (Summary by Availle) (5 hr 32 min)

Chapters

Foreword

1:39

Read by William Gavula

EXOTICS: I Fuji-No-Yama

48:14

Read by William Gavula

II Insect Musicians

46:59

Read by MaryAnn

III A Question in the Zen Texts

10:53

Read by William Gavula

IV The Literature of the Dead, Part 1

42:51

Read by Availle

IV The Literature of the Dead, Part 2

28:33

Read by Availle

V Frogs

19:33

Read by Larry Wilson

VI Of Moon-Desire

12:48

Read by Lynne T

RETROSPECTIVES: VII First Impressions

14:08

Read by Isana

VIII Beauty is Memory

11:47

Read by Larry Wilson

IX Sadness in Beauty

10:25

Read by JenMitchell

X Parfum de Jeunesse

5:21

Read by K.G.Cross

XI Azure Psychology

14:12

Read by Larry Wilson

XII A Serenade

8:53

Read by K.G.Cross

XIII A Red Sunset

13:42

Read by heeheekitty

XIV Frisson

12:55

Read by heeheekitty

XV Vespertina Cognitio

20:52

Read by Availle

XVI The Eternal Haunter

8:56

Read by K.G.Cross

Bewertungen

Curious collection

(3 Sterne)

A collection of very introspective pieces by Lafcadio but not as insightful as his other works highlighting Japanese culture and history. However the first chapter on climbing Mt Fuji is a thrilling piece of writing.