A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (Version 2)


Read by Peter Tucker

(4.8 stars; 6 reviews)

A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (commonly called Treatise when referring to Berkeley's works) is a 1710 work, in English, by Irish Empiricist philosopher George Berkeley. This book largely seeks to refute the claims made by Berkeley's contemporary John Locke about the nature of human perception. Whilst, like all the Empiricist philosophers, both Locke and Berkeley agreed that we are having experiences, regardless of whether material objects exist, Berkeley sought to prove that the outside world (the world which causes the ideas one has within one's mind) is also composed solely of ideas. Berkeley did this by suggesting that "Ideas can only resemble Ideas" - the mental ideas that we possess can only resemble other ideas (not material objects) and thus the external world consists not of physical form, but rather of ideas. This world is (or, at least, was) given logic and regularity by some other force, which Berkeley concludes is God. ( Wikipedia) (3 hr 38 min)

Chapters

Dedication 3:45 Read by Peter Tucker
Introduction 41:05 Read by Peter Tucker
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 1 29:15 Read by Peter Tucker
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 2 28:46 Read by Peter Tucker
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 3 28:01 Read by Peter Tucker
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 4 28:47 Read by Peter Tucker
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 5 30:05 Read by Peter Tucker
Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 6 28:21 Read by Peter Tucker

Reviews

Onteresting read... but yeah, I'm not convinced


(5 stars)

Strange argumentation if there is any... I still give it 5 stars for the effort.

Excellent reader. Kept my attention.


(5 stars)

Engaging writer on a difficult subject.