Martin Hewitt, Investigator


Read by Kirsten Wever

(4.6 stars; 43 reviews)

Here are seven mystery stories featuring Martin Hewitt, Detective, and narrated (of course) by his (nameless) sidekick. Arthur Morrison certainly has imagination, as shown by the very wide range of situations, motivations, crimes and characters he presents in these stories. Hewitt may be after a Russian spy or a domestic animal; he investigates the burglary of documents vital to national security, but also the destruction of a work of art -- which is counterfeit. (summary by Kirsten Wever) (6 hr 23 min)

Chapters

Chapter 1: The Lenton Croft Robberies 1:00:38 Read by Kirsten Wever
Chapter 2: The Loss of Sammy Crockett 55:07 Read by Kirsten Wever
Chapter 3: The Case of Mr. Foggatt 48:27 Read by Kirsten Wever
Chapter 4: The Case of the Dixon Torpedo 51:53 Read by Kirsten Wever
Chapter 5 The Quinton Jewel Affair 1:01:56 Read by Kirsten Wever
Chapter 6: The Stanway Cameo Mystery 58:11 Read by Kirsten Wever
Chapter 7: The Affair of the Tortoise 47:03 Read by Kirsten Wever

Reviews

Poor choice of book!


(3 stars)

Although the first 6 stories are good the seventh is grossly offensive! I question why such a book was selected to be read!

Fun Listen, Thank You.


(5 stars)

Btw, plenty of filthy accents in England. Get your own app if youre so intolerant.

Very well read


(5 stars)

I'm just beginning, so I can't say much about the stories, but as there are very few reviews as yet, I wanted to assure would-be listeners that it is certainly very well read.

The usual smart detective


(4 stars)

good job by the narrator. the stories are very much typical, though interesting.

Enjoyable listen


(5 stars)

Like puzzle solving with good characters

Perfect!!!!!


(5 stars)

Really enjoying this app and this book!!!!

American, read distinctly yet pleasantly and engagingly!


(5 stars)

This collection of light-weight mystery stories is perfect for background relaxation. First, they hold the interest but don't need intensive thought. Second, Kirsten Wever, provides that rare and desirable thing: an American recording as clear and and engaging as any British reading could be.