Delia Blanchflower


Read by Simon Evers

(3.9 stars; 19 reviews)

Delia Blanchflower’s father has died, leaving her a considerable inheritance. However, she has become caught up in the militant wing of the Suffragist movement and has come under the spell of Gertrude Marvell, one of the leaders of the movement. Because he strongly disapproves, Delia’s father has put his money in trust until she is older. He has appointed an old friend – Mark Winnington – as the main trustee. Against the background of the Suffragist movement, the book follows the developing relationships between Delia, Gertrude and Mark Winnington. - Summary by Simon Evers (10 hr 48 min)

Chapters

Chapter 1 33:25 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 2 32:49 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 3 28:46 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 4 32:54 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 5 28:23 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 6 23:02 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 7 33:27 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 8 39:49 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 9 36:19 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 10 37:20 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 11 33:51 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 12 30:33 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 13 38:06 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 14 28:40 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 15 34:06 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 16 25:11 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 17 40:17 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 18 35:23 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 19 29:44 Read by Simon Evers
Chapter 20 26:29 Read by Simon Evers

Reviews

A really unique story!


(5 stars)

I’ve listened to hundreds of audiobooks, and I have to say this one really does strike me as unique. What a great author, and what an interesting set of circumstances. The author addresses the women’s suffrage movement you know calm and balanced way, and addresses the whole question of what makes the most compelling arguments for an issue. The characters in the story are rich and deep, and there is a lot of happens and it it keeps it interesting from the start to the end. As always beautifully read by this narrator.

AntiFeminist Propaganda


(2 stars)

Mary Augusta Ward was the President of the Women’s Anti-Suffrage League. While a great fan of Simon Evers, it’s hard to understand his investment in effort to bring this blatantly insulting work to the intelligence of women to some unknown perspective. The only value this novel has is perhaps a view into the minds of the people who believed that women were incapable of having the ability to make their own decisions. This mindset still reigns strong in the ignorance of those places such as in the US, where voting laws have now, over one hundred years later, come into question. Ignorance grows like weeds where its seeds are planted. Update weeks later; NOTE: My apologies to Mr. Evers. I am glad that I heard this story. It’s always better to understand, perhaps if only a little, those with whom we are in the strongest disagreement. And by that I mean the author and those then and now who believe that women are incapable of making their own choices.