The Diary of a Nobody


Read by Martin Clifton

(4.6 stars; 192 reviews)

The Diary of a Nobody is the fictitious record of fifteen months in the life of Charles Pooter, his family, friends and small circle of acquaintances. It first appeared, serialised in Punch magazine and might be regarded as the first ‘blog’; being a record of the simplicities and humiliations in the life of this mundane, but upright, city clerk, who had an incontestable faith that a record of his daily life was worth preserving for posterity.

Set in about 1891 in Holloway, which was then a typical suburb of the impecuniously respectable kind, the authors contrive a record of the manners, customs and experiences of the late Victorian era. The bare record of facts, simply recorded, manages to be humorous rather than dull, no doubt because of the usual occupations of the authors.
George Grossmith (1847-1912) was an actor and comedian.
Weedon Grossmith (1852-1919) was an entertainer and illustrated the original work.
(Summary by Martin Clifton) (4 hr 21 min)

Chapters

Chapter 00 0:50 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 01 7:21 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 02 13:04 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 03 12:47 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 04 11:52 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 05 16:26 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 06 10:23 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 07 11:13 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 08 11:50 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 09 7:27 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 10 7:07 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 11 15:15 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 12 8:09 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 13 12:49 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 14 15:17 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 15 8:07 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 16 6:48 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 17 5:33 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 18 15:59 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 19 9:02 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 20 10:32 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 21 11:34 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 22 18:37 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 23 11:07 Read by Martin Clifton
Chapter 24 2:42 Read by Martin Clifton

Reviews

LOL - between the writing and the reader's delivery...


(4.5 stars)

... this work is hilarious. the reader has such a dead pan delivery that you actually have to listen to what he is saying and you'll find yourself giggling, then laughing, then ROFL! this book makes me grateful for the 15-second reverse feature, because I would laugh too loudly and miss the next bit. I also related to while chapters and found myself catching bits I had missed the first time.

My fave librivox bedtime story


(5 stars)

I have listened to this over and over. A slow-paced, yet witty journal of the frustrations and shenanigans of the mundane life. Think Oscar Wilde meets Bridget Jones, and slow it down to the bumbling, pace of some Sunday afternoons and you will not be far off. I absolutely adore Martin Clifton's recordings. He is so clear and calm. Perfect to listen to at the end of a busy day. Would highly recommend.

Love it


(4.5 stars)

I have always loved this book and can read and listen to it over and over. Love the dead pan delivery. So restful to listen to.

Excellent


(5 stars)

A great reading as always from Martin Clifton, this time of that mundane yet somehow lovable Mr Pooter.

a good book


(5 stars)

A story detailing the life of a faithful clerk, his wife, won and friends. Saved from dullness by humor and surprisingly interesting. Recommend for anyone who enjoys memoirs and 19th century culture/day to day lifestyle.

Love It. I have listened to it twice and its still fab.


(5 stars)

Martin Clifton Is a brilliant reader. He brings the characters to life so well xx

Loved it


(5 stars)

I agree with the other reviewers, Martin Cliftons dead pan matter of fact reading makes this such an enjoyable funny book to listen to.

Exceptional narration, witty satire.


(5 stars)

The narration by Martin Clifton is polished, and his voice is warm and pleasant as he recounts the misadventures of Mr. Pooter, a well meaning, modest, yet pretentious `nobody' who manages to misstep at work, play, on transport, and in his domestic affairs. Thankfully, because the reader will become quite fond of him, all ends well for the Pooters of very early 20th century Holloway.