The Old Régime in Canada


Read by Brendan Stallard

(4.9 stars; 9 reviews)

Francis Parkman is an nineteenth century American historian. He devoted most of his life to a seven volume history of "The French and English in North America." "The Old Régime in Canada" is the fourth volume of the series and mainly covers the years from 1643 to 1663. Parkman is an excellent writer who organizes and tells a good story. - Summary by Richard Carpenter

Part 1: Pioneers of France in the New World
Part 2: The Jesuits in North America in the 17th Century
Part 4: The Old Régime in Canada
Part 5: Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV
Part 6: Montcalm and Wolfe
Part 7: A Half Century of Conflict (13 hr 22 min)

Chapters

Preface 6:48 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 1 31:15 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 2 36:09 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 3 23:05 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 4, Part 1 35:28 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 4, Part 2 40:22 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 5 40:24 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 6 37:06 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 7 38:06 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 8 22:56 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 9 28:17 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 10 21:57 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 11 24:19 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 12 17:11 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 13 30:22 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 14 36:37 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 15 12:43 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 16 22:44 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 17 20:23 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 18 36:40 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 19 43:03 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 20 47:14 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 21 22:39 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 22 1:04:13 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 23 47:37 Read by Brendan Stallard
Chapter 24 14:51 Read by Brendan Stallard

Reviews

HOW DID CANADA SURVIVE


(5 stars)

Parkman thoroughly analyzes the successes and failures of the historical period in question. One wonders how any colony could prosper under such ruinous and changeable policies. If the reader decides to quit the book before the end, let me urge him to at least read the final chapter. This fourteen minute work is a masterpiece of political analogy, showing the prospects for certain groups based squarely on their political experience. This easily explains the mis-guided and seldom successful policy of the US exportation of so-called democracy to third world and/or developing nations. His ending conclusion that the British conquest was the best thing to happen to Canada may rankle the Gallican spirit, but it is certainly true!