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The Satyricon

Gelesen von LibriVox Volunteers

(4,389 Sterne; 9 Bewertungen)

Satyricon (or Satyrica) is a Latin work of fiction in a mixture of prose and poetry. It is believed to have been written by Gaius Petronius, though the manuscript tradition identifies the author as a certain Titus Petronius. As with the Metamorphoses of Apuleius, classical scholars often describe it as a "Roman novel", without necessarily implying continuity with the modern literary form.

The surviving portions of the text detail the misadventures of the narrator, Encolpius, and his lover, a handsome sixteen-year-old boy named Giton. Throughout the novel, Encolpius has a hard time keeping his lover faithful to him as he is constantly being enticed away by others. Encolpius's friend Ascyltus (who seems to have previously been in a relationship with Encolpius) is another major character. It is a rare example of a Roman novel, the only other surviving example (quite different in style and plot) being Metamorphoses written by Lucius Apuleius. It is also extremely important evidence for the reconstruction of what everyday life must have been like for the lower classes during the early Roman Empire.
(Summary taken from Wikipedia) (7 hr 56 min)

Chapters

Preface and Introduction

31:53

Read by Ann Boulais

Vol 1 - Adventures of Encolpius and His Companions, Ch 1-10

20:00

Read by Brendan Stallard

Vol 1 - Adventures of Encolpius and His Companions, Ch 11

25:52

Read by Brendan Stallard

Vol 1 - Adventures of Encolpius and His Companions, Ch 12-19

18:00

Read by Brendan Stallard

Vol 1 - Adventures of Encolpius and His Companions, Ch 20-26

20:42

Read by Brendan Stallard

Vol 2 - The Dinner of Trimalchio, Ch 27-37

24:40

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 2 - The Dinner of Trimalchio, Ch 38-44

22:27

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 2 - The Dinner of Trimalchio, Ch 45-52

23:26

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 2 - The Dinner of Trimalchio, Ch 53-59

21:24

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 2 - The Dinner of Trimalchio, Ch 60-69

27:34

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 2 - The Dinner of Trimalchio, Ch 70-78

26:38

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 3 - The Further Adventures of Encolpius and His Companions, Ch 79-88

27:35

Read by miette

Vol 3 - The Further Adventures of Encolpius and His Companions, Ch 89-98

31:15

Read by miette

Vol 4 - Encolpius, Giton and Eumolpus Escape by Sea, Ch 99-105

18:19

Read by Saethram

Vol 4 - Encolpius, Giton and Eumolpus Escape by Sea, Ch 106-110

15:16

Read by Saethram

Vol 4 - Encolpius, Giton, and Eumolpus Escape by Sea, Ch 111-116

19:25

Read by Saethram

Vol 4 - Encolpius, Giton and Eumolpus Escape by Sea, Ch 117-124

37:02

Read by Denny Sayers (d. 2015)

Vol 5 - Affairs at Crotona, Ch 125-131

20:42

Read by Andrew Coleman

Vol 5 - Affairs at Crotona, Ch 132-137

23:24

Read by Andrew Coleman

Vol 5 - Affairs at Crotona, Ch 138-141

20:29

Read by Andrew Coleman

Bewertungen

Well-read but problematic version

(2,5 Sterne)

The readers of this Roman erotic novel have done a generally good job (though the Classical names are, as usual, unevenly treated by different readers). It's very unfortunate, though, that the readers decided to go for this particular version of this fragmentary novel probably written in the reign of Nero by Gaius Petronius Arbiter. This translation makes for good reading, but only by using forgeries that fill in the gaps in this extremely lacunose text. You get a rounded story cost of avoiding the true nature of the original text which contains a number of episodes without connection and with much missing material.