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The Fairy Tales of Science

Gelesen von J. M. Smallheer

(4,288 Sterne; 26 Bewertungen)

This book, written in the mid 19th century and illustrated by Charles H. Bennett, provides an entertaining introduction to topics in science for children. In each chapter, the author uses a popular myth or fairy tale to lay the groundwork for an equally fascinating "fairy tale of science" full of interesting facts and real life examples. (Summary by J. M. Smallheer) (8 hr 0 min)

Chapters

01 - The Age of Monsters

20:36

Read by J. M. Smallheer

02 - The Amber Spirit

19:07

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03 - The Four Elements

33:09

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04 - The Life of an Atom

18:01

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05 - A Little Bit

13:59

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06 - Modern Alchemy

18:08

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07 - The Magic of the Sunbeam

19:42

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08 - Two Eyes are Better than One

13:26

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09 - The Mermaid's Home

20:38

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10 - Animated Flowers

14:37

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11 - Metamorphoses

17:40

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12 - Water Bewitched

28:38

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13 - A Flight through Space

34:54

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14 - A Tale of a Comet

26:21

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15 - The Invisible World

21:58

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16 - Wonderful Plants

17:39

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17 - Moving Lands

15:39

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18 - The Gnomes

33:08

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19 - Pluto's Kingdom, Part 1

24:25

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20 - Pluto's Kingdom, Part 2

23:28

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21 - The Wonderful Lamp, Part 1

27:00

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22 - The Wonderful Lamp, Part 2

17:49

Read by J. M. Smallheer

Bewertungen

a very interesting books full of facts and information highly re

(5 Sterne)

A bit of charm, good intentions, and lists of facts

(3 Sterne)

At communicating complex science topics to children: FAIL. The mention of fairy tales in the title is quite misleading. There are no fairy tales as such and it is not, as I'd hoped, a scientific look at episodes or incidents found in fairy tales. He introduces a topic with the conceit of having a comet deliver a lecture on comets, or a dwarf on the topic or minerals and metals. And it has a certain charm. But then follows a dry lecture on whatever it is. And then the language is not adjusted for young minds. These days children are very much catered to (not a judgement, just a truth) and perhaps don't have the high intellectual standards as was expected of them in the 1850s (or whenever this was written), but when I hear "anomalous", I'm guessing this wasn't play-tested with seven-year-olds. I have a Master's Degree and have a (perhaps unhealthy) addiction to books, but a few of the words in this had ME scratching my head. At communicating complex science science topics to adults: D. I want to give it a C-, but I don't think I honestly can. For each topic, the author seemed to choose the least compelling way to present it to the lay public. For stars- magical, mystical stars- he gives us "There are this many stars of the first magnitude. There are this many stars of the second magnitude. There are this many stars of the third magnitude. There are this many stars of the fourth magnitude. There are..." Sporadically he remembers he's writing for children, and adds a little whimsy. But these bits seem like awkward asides, rather than lightening the lectures. Why three stars, then? The reader does a very good job. And I can feel in the writing that there is all the good will in the world in this work. He loves his topics, and sincerely wants to let us in on a good thing. He just doesn't know how.

awesome 😊

(5 Sterne)

this is a nice book with loving stories

Thank you

(5 Sterne)

Interesring book thar is well read.